Why do Navy SEAL candidates quit BUD/S?

Andy Stumpf former BUD/S instructor

“I wanted to make more people quit.”

In Episode 3 of “Cleared Hot”, Andy Stumpf talks about his time as a Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUD/S) instructor. According to Wikipedia, “BUD/S is a 24-week training challenge that develops the SEAL candidates’ mental and physical stamina…” and according to Andy, one of the instructors’ jobs is to eliminate candidates from the program. Specifically, those who do not have the mental toughness required to be an operator.

Cleared Hot Episode 3 – Sean Hughes

“Nothing lasts forever, this sucks now, but it’s going to end.”

Andy interviewed many candidates who quit. He wanted to know what lead to their decision, so he could develop techniques to exploit the weakness in others. Their most frequent response was that they were overwhelmed by the duration of BUD/S. They were experiencing discomfort and multiplied it by the time remaining in the course. Psyching themselves out.

One Foot in Front of the Other.

Successful people focus on breaking down seemingly insurmountable tasks into smaller objectives. Achieving each smaller objectives creates a momentum that allows them to blast through the larger obstacles.

Although I’m not a SEAL and never will be. I’ve personally experienced this in Marathon Training, Weight Lifting, and Entrepreneurship. The first mile, squat, and pitch — those moments felt overwhelming because I knew how tiny my current output was compared to the end goal. But each day I put in the work. I focused on following the plan and completing today’s objectives, not worrying about the end state. When the time came to complete the mission I had been training for, my body and my mind were ready.

Show up, do the work, rest, repeat.

Questions of the Day

What’s the largest goal you’ve succeeded at? How did you break it down into smaller pieces that you could accomplish? What in your life today is stressing you? What’s the next incremental step towards fixing it?

How do you leave Social Media without losing your network?

I’ve spent the last six months weaning off of Facebook’s suite of apps. Their lack of ethics finally outweighed the value of their ubiquity. Because of this, I began the process of deletion (Facebook, Instagram, Messenger). Almost immediately, I felt a notable change in my overall level of happiness and contentment.

Trending topics and outrage focused feeds may have been overloading my psyche. My brain is only able to effectively deal with the level of stress generated by the happenings of a small community (See: Dunbar’s Number). I was genuinely surprised by how much better I’ve felt once I removed awareness of the continuous-crisis news-cycle from my life.

The major downside that originally kept me from leaving was FOMO. I didn’t want to miss out on dank memes and interesting dialogue. To counter this perceived loss, I’ve decided to start generating more original content and I’m working to develop deeper relationships with key individuals in my life.

Plan of Action

  1. Backup my data from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn
  2. Deactivate, delete, or refactor accounts
  3. Find a new messaging alternative
  4. Develop more active relationships with my network

Backup and Deactivate

There are plenty of posts on how to backup Facebook and Twitter data and deactivate your accounts. So I’m not going to cover Step 1 and 2.

Text Messaging

I decided to switch my primary messaging client over to Signal since it supports end-to-end encryption, is easy-to-use, and is cross-platform. It also supported encrypted phone calls. The only thing that I’ll miss is the video conferencing – which I plan to handle through Google Hangouts or Skype.

Activate My Network

I now block time using recurring appointments to make phone calls to key friends/family and to blog. I will be distributing my blog via mailing-list and I plan to put hooks into each post to start 1-to-1 conversations. By disintermediating my relationships, I hope that I can build a stronger network that involves more personal and meaningful interactions.

The Question of the Day

How do you feel about your social media usage? On average do you think it makes you happier and more content or does it leave you with feelings of insecurity and anxiety? What’s keeping you from disconnecting from the major platforms?

Faster more relevant blog posts PostHaste!

I’m beta testing PostHaste from ClearView Social – learn more about it through the video below:

 

What if you could assemble high performing blog posts in just a few moments? What if this content you create would also tap into a larger conversation automatically, piggy-backing off of interest in current issues in the news? What if you could do all of this in just a couple of minutes? Now you can, with Posthaste.

https://clearviewsocial.com/announcing-the-birth-of-our-new-product/

Martians and Entrepreneurs

At some point, everything’s gonna go south on you and you’re going to say, this is it. This is how I end. Now you can either accept that, or you can get to work. That’s all it is. You just begin. You do the math. You solve one problem and you solve the next one, and then the next. And If you solve enough problems, you get to come home. -Mark Watney

In “The Martian” by Andy Weir, Mark Watney is stranded on Mars with his survival completely dependent upon his ingenuity, grit, and super-human ability to never lose hope.  It’s been my experience that startups run on hope long before they have actual capital to deploy,  they also crater when founder’s lose hope even though they still might have money in the bank.

Having a cultural touchstone that reinforces your team’s morale during your startup’s biggest challenges is an effective way to maintain hope.